slubs in the city

Slub (adj): Maverick; unorthodox; independent in behavior or thought.

why I choose to serve: living in solidarity

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“Volunteerism benefits both the society at large and the individual volunteer by strengthening trust, solidarity, and reciprocity among citizens, and by purposefully creating opportunities for participation.” -UN State of the World’s Volunteerism Report, 2011

I am over four months in to my year as an AmeriCorps*VISTA. For those of you who do not know, AmeriCorps is like the domestic Peace Corps. Its three different branches work to fight illiteracy, provide disaster relief, improve health services, manage after-school programs, aid community development, resettle refugees, and strengthen volunteerism in nonprofit and government agencies across America. VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America), one of the three branches, strives to fight poverty by increasing organizational capacity through sustainable efforts. I want to take some time, as we navigate our way through the holiday season, to reflect on my experience so far and why I choose to serve.

Living at the poverty line

As an AmeriCorps*VISTA, my stipend is calculated so that I live at 105% of the poverty line. I qualify for and use food assistance. I have a scholarship to the YWCA. I can get discounts to local attractions ($1 for the science museum!).

The intention of this small stipend is to allow us to live in solidarity with the community we serve. The idea is that we will come to better understand the difficulties of living in poverty, so that we can better empathize and better serve low-income communities.

Goodbye lattes…

Practically, this means that I have had to be more conscious of where I spend my money. I have to budget so that I have enough gas money to make it across the Cities and back for work. I have stopped frequenting coffee shops and Banana Republic.  I have been more frugal as I begin Christmas shopping. But, I must stop and ask myself…is this poverty?

Applying for food assistance at Hennepin County may be the strongest glimpse at what living below the poverty line is like, although I would still argue I had an unique experience. Hennepin County is a large, crowded, and confusing building. When a person goes to apply for assistance of any kind, they can expect for it to take upwards of two hours. Luckily, I had the flexibility to spend that much time there. Can you imagine doing it while employed, with children, and lacking access to transportation?

Hennepin County Social Services Building. It is huge, crowded, and confusing.

Laura and I in our business casual clothing stood out like sore thumbs. We received a lot of “why are you here” looks. My caseworker talked to me like a peer, not a client. She told me about her bad day and how they were understaffed, but overworked. I haven’t had a problem with my EBT card or account yet.

While it went smoothly for me, for my roommates and friends it was often times a struggle. We have reflected on the fact that we all had trouble filling out the application and navigating the bureaucracy… and we are college-educated, native English speakers (see how we are constantly surrounded by our privilege?). And this is just a small glimpse into what it is like to live below the poverty line.

Living in solidarity

I am not trying to undermine what AmeriCorps is trying to do. Honestly, I think living at the poverty line is a great experience. I believe it is so important to understand and try to relate to the population I work with.  But, again, do I really live in poverty? Probably not, because poverty is not simply a lack of money. It is a lack of opportunities. A lack of access to the most basic things like healthcare, childcare, jobs, affordable housing, networks… but I have access to those services. I have my parents, who have graciously lent me their car, kept me on their cellphone and insurance plan, given me gifts in the kindest way possible, and always been there for me in a pinch. I have an incredible network of St. Olaf alums. I have a college education. I have met fantastic professionals in the nonprofit field. I have opportunities. I know my situation is temporary.

Yes, let’s live in solidarity. But not a solidarity based on what we earn. Not a solidarity based on the color of skin. Not a solidarity based upon our religion, sexual orientation, gender identification, native tongue, etc. Living in solidarity is so much deeper than that. Instead, let us live in solidarity based on our common humanity. An acknowledgement that we all deserve access to basic needs and beyond. That by working together we can all thrive. This is why I choose to serve.

I want to leave you with a quote for reflection that was introduced to me by one of my favorite college professors, Tom Williamson. This is a quote that really encapsulates how I feel about service and how I strive to serve others. I would love to hear our readers’ comments.

“If you have come here to help me, you are wasting your time. But if you have come because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.” – Aboriginal Activists Group, Queensland, 1970s (Lilla Watson)

Thanks for reading. -Kat

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4 thoughts on “why I choose to serve: living in solidarity

  1. Thank you for posting this! You have summarized, concisely and eloquently, my own experience as an AmeriCorps VISTA living at the poverty line. Like you, I have an education, a support network of peers, coworkers who look out for me, and the time and flexibility to fill out forms and sit in government offices. I have also felt the stark difference between the people who are legitimately living at and well below the poverty level. I live in a safe apartment, I have a guaranteed job through the end of the year, I have a car, a computer, and opportunities for employment once my term of service is complete. The truth is that I don’t feel any actual solidarity with the people on whose behalf I am working, which is perpetuated by the fact that I am working for an environmental organization. Any benefits we hope to pass on to the community are clean water and clean air, which are important of course for the health of the people who depend on it. But I think it is hard to justify spending time and money on long-term impacts and environmental health when more immediate needs (food, and shelter) are lacking.

    Well anyway, the point is that I really appreciate your post, and it is interesting to know that experiences are similar in two very different parts of the country.

    • Bethany,

      Thanks so much for reading and commenting! Being an Americorps*VISTA is such an interesting experience; I am glad to know you are having a similar experience. I think it is always hard to decide which community needs to address, immediate ones or long-term ones. Obviously both need to be addressed. I volunteer at homeless shelter, and we always talk about how emergency shelter is not a solution, but something needs to be done in the meantime. I think that focusing on long-term solutions, however, should be a priority because the impacts they have are great and permanent. Know that the work you do is appreciated and important!

      Kat

  2. Kat, what a wonderful thoughtful blog, I am proud to know you. Thanks for continuing to grow and learn and deepen. Happy holidays.

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